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Archive for December, 2008|Monthly archive page

Nu Programming for iPhone

In iphone, Lisp on December 24, 2008 at 6:49 am

See the following simple site for a quick tutorial on how to program in Nu on the iPhone.

Cross-compiling for iPhone

In Uncategorized on December 20, 2008 at 3:38 am

Edit November 24, 2010: Building OpenCV

If you are here just to cross-compile OpenCV, please visit this new post instead.  The older post is a little more detailed, error-prone, pedantic, and maybe out of date.

Original post:

Cross-compiling is one of the many joys of iPhone development.  Generally cross compiling is as easy as calling a `configure’ script with the correct parameters:

In our case for putting OpenCV on the iPhone, we used the following command:


# build arm version
echo "Building iPhoneOS arm version of the OpenCV framework"
echo "============================================="
if test -d ../build_iphoneos; then cd ../build_iphoneos; fi
./configure \
--host="arm-apple-darwin9" --target=arm-apple-darwin9 \
--without-python --without-gtk --without-swig --disable-app \
--enable-static \
--disable-shared \
CC=/Developer/Platforms/iPhoneOS.platform/Developer/usr/bin/gcc-4.0 \
CPP=/Developer/Platforms/iPhoneOS.platform/Developer/usr/bin/cpp \
CXXCPP=/Developer/Platforms/iPhoneOS.platform/Developer/usr/bin/cpp \
CXX=/Developer/Platforms/iPhoneOS.platform/Developer/usr/bin/gcc-4.0\
AR=/Developer/Platforms/iPhoneOS.platform/Developer/usr/bin/ar \
RANLIB=/Developer/Platforms/iPhoneOS.platform/Developer/usr/bin/ranlib \
NM=/Developer/Platforms/iPhoneOS.platform/Developer/usr/bin/nm \
CFLAGS="-arch armv6 -pipe -std=c99 -Wno-trigraphs -fpascal-strings -fasm-blocks -O0 -Wreturn-type -Wunused-variable -fmessage-length=0 -fvisibility=hidden -miphoneos-version-min=2.0 -gdwarf-2 -mthumb -miphoneos-version-min=2.0 -I/Library/iPhone/include -isysroot /Developer/Platforms/iPhoneOS.platform/Developer/SDKs/iPhoneOS2.2.sdk" \
LDFLAGS="-arch armv6 -pipe -std=c99 -gdwarf-2 -mthumb -I/Library/iPhone/include -isysroot /Developer/Platforms/iPhoneOS.platform/Developer/SDKs/iPhoneOS2.0.sdk" \
CXXFLAGS="-arch armv6 -pipe -std=c99 -Wno-trigraphs -fpascal-strings -fasm-blocks -O0 -Wreturn-type -Wunused-variable -fmessage-length=0 -fvisibility=hidden -miphoneos-version-min=2.0 -gdwarf-2 -mthumb -miphoneos-version-min=2.0 -I/Library/iPhone/include -isysroot /Developer/Platforms/iPhoneOS.platform/Developer/SDKs/iPhoneOS2.2.sdk"

the CC, CPP, CXX, CXXCPP, AR, RANLIB, and NM arguments specify the executable files in charge of (CC) compiling C, (CPP) preprocessing C, (CXX & CXXCPP) the same for C++, (AR, RANLIB, NM) library related minutae.  A lot of the CFLAGS LDFLAGS CXXFLAGS are redundant or unnecessary, but they work so why not?

The host= and target= options control cross-compilation.  You really only need to set HOST, which is the machine type on which the compiled code will run.  In our case it is arm-apple-darwin9 which is the machine type of the iPhone.  We gathered a lot of these arguments by building something in XCode and looking at the exact arguments to the C compiler. (You can observe those in the same window as the error messages.)

The C family of programming languages has dumbed down our lives a great deal lately.  Cross-compiling is an even dumber phenomenon than the ins and outs of normal iPhone programming.  Hopefully this post will help bring the joys of cross-compiling into your own living room.  If you find this helpful, please comment on what library you have successfully put on the phone.  If anyone wants OpenCV, let us know.